Diedrich IR-12 Series Roaster

From Mindworks
Jump to: navigation, search
Diedrich IR-12 Series Roaster
Sponsors
Team Name MBC - Mean Bean Consulting
Duration Summer 2014 - Fall 2014
Faculty Advisers
Students
  • Matthew Garrison
  • Matthew Nichols
  • Benjamin Springli

Our client,Diedrich Manufacturing, proposed a student ran design project that worked to improve their IR-12 coffee Roasters. Diedrich Manufacturing gives students the opportunity to demonstrate and further develop their engineering skills by challenging them to figure out the inner working of their IR-12 Series Coffee Roaster and make it more efficient.

Design Task

Mean Bean Consulting (MBC) Capstone project will be to work with Diedrich Manufacturing and their IR-12 Series Coffee Roaster. MBC will develop a computational model of the inner workings of the roaster to find the temperature fluctuation and volumetric flow rate. The computational model will then be validated using different experimental apparatuses throughout the IR-12 roaster.

Goals:

  1. Model the heat exchanger using solidworks
  2. Develop Computational model to determine Temperature throughout the IR-12.
  3. Use several different sensors that can handle heat in the range of 350-1000 degrees F and distribute them throughout the roaster
  4. Validate the Computational model with experimentally and analyzed statistically

Detailed Specifications

2014 MBC Specssheet.jpg

Project Learning

Circuit Board Research

Boards Specifications
2014 MBC Board1.jpg

8/16-Channel Thermocouple/Voltage Input USB Data Acquisition Module

  • Final Selection
  • Inputs 8 Differential or 16 Single-Ended Analog Inputs
  • Resolution-24 Bit Resolution with Up to 1000 Samples/Sec
  • Programmable-Type J, K, T, E, R, S, B, N *Thermocouple or Voltage Input
  • Free Windows Software Suite - Includes DAQ Central Menu Driven Windows Software
  • .NET API/Driver for Visual Basic, C#, and Visual C++ for Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7
  • Power input-Powered Directly by USB Port or External DC Power Supply
  • Excitation-Provides +12 Vdc Output for Sensor Excitation
  • Type K -129 to 1372°C (-200 to 2502°F)
  • K = ±1.2°C
2014 MBC Board2.jpg

1019_1 - PhidgetInterfaceKit 8/8/8 w/6 Port Hub

  • Final Selection
  • Number of Analog Inputs- 8
  • Analog Input Resolution- 10 bit
  • Input Impedance- 900 kΩ
  • Analog Input Voltage Min- 0 V DC
  • Analog Input Voltage Max- 5 V DC
  • 5V Reference Error Max 0.5 %
  • Analog Input Update Rate Min- 1 samples/s
  • Analog Input Update Rate Max (4 Channels)- 1000 samples/s
  • Analog Input Update Rate Max (8 Channels)- 500 samples/s
  • Analog Input Update Rate Max (WebService)- 62.5 samples/s
2014 MBC Board3.jpg

1048_0 - PhidgetTemperatureSensor 4-Input

  • Final Selection
  • API Object Name- TemperatureSensor
  • Number of Thermocouple Inputs- 4
  • Temperature Update Rate- 25 samples/s
  • Ambient Temperature Error Max- ± 0.5 °C
  • Thermocouple Error Max (K-Type)- ± 2 °C
  • Thermocouple Voltage Resolution- 1.5 μV DC
  • Thermocouple Temperature Resolution (K-Type)- 0.04 °C
  • Recommended Wire Size- 16 - 26 AWG
  • Operating Temperature Min- 0 °C
  • Operating Temperature Max- 70 °C

Thermocouple Research

Thermocouples Specifications
2014 MBC Thermocouple1.jpg

High Temperature Inconel Overbraided Ceramic Fiber Insulated Thermocouples

  • Final Selection
  • Wire Gage: 20 gage solid–standard limits of error
  • Insulation: Nextel® ceramic fiber
  • Overbraiding & Fittings: Inconel 600®
  • Temperature: 980°C (1800°F) continuous,1090°C ( 2000°F) short-term service, depending on thermocouple type.
  • Termination: Ceramic beaded leads with compensated spade lugs, OMEGA® OSTW 220°C (425°F) male connector
  • 4 Different probe styles
2014 MBC Thermocouple2.jpg

3110_0 - TPK-01H Bead Probe K-Type Thermocouple

  • Thermocouple Type- K
  • Probe Type- Bead
  • Ambient Temperature Min- -50 °C
  • Ambient Temperature Max- 785 °C
  • Ambient Temperature Error Max- ± 0.75 °C
  • Connector Type- 6mm Stripped Leads
  • Cable Length- 1 m
  • Cable Gauge- 24 AWG
  • Insulation Material- Fiberglass
  • Probe Material- chromel-alumel
2014 MBC Thermocouple3.jpg

3109_0 - TPK-01G Bead Probe K-type Thermocouple

  • Thermocouple Type- K
  • Probe Type- Bead
  • Ambient Temperature Min- -50 °C
  • Ambient Temperature Max- 450 °C
  • Ambient Temperature Error Max- ± 0.75 °C
  • Connector Type- 6mm Stripped Leads
  • Cable Length- 1 m
  • Cable Gauge- 24 AWG
  • Insulation Material- Fiberglass
  • Probe Material- chromel-alumel


Experimental Setup

Setup Description
Roaster Setup

In testing we placed thermocouples throughout the IR-12 Roaster. The thermocouples connected to the Omega and Phidget data acquisition devices

Computer Setup

The Computers have the data acquisition devices connected to the Artisan and the Omega software. The data was saved as a .csv file and then imported into excel for analysis.

Testing

During testing one student would monitor the computers making sure the data collection remains constant and doesn't freeze. We also had two students monitoring time and drum temperatures by hand.

Data Collected

To comply with the confidentiality agreement with Diedrich the graph legends have been removed from the data.

Data Collected Description
August Roast

This test was the initial data collection completed on August 8th. During the test the side doors remained opened limiting air flow through the system. The data was from the start of warmup to the end of a roast. There were 8 thermocouples spread out through the IR-12.

September Roast 1

This test was roasted on September 18th. This test had 10 Thermocouples spread out through the IR-12. The doors were opened off and on to take drum temperatures throughout the roast you can see the temperature fluctuated when doors where opened and closed.

September Roast 2

This data was the second test done on September 18th. The test had 9 Thermocouples spread throughout the IR-12. The side doors remained closed throughout the roast.

October Roast 1

This test was roasted on October 24th. The test had 13 Thermocouples spread throughout the IR-12. The side doors remained closed throughout the roast. This test is the data that is compared to our computational simulation because it is real roasting conditions.

October Roast 2

This test was roasted on October 24th. The test had 14 Thermocouples spread throughout the IR-12. The side doors remained closed throughout the roast. For this test we closed off the gap between the top of the roaster and the drum to see the effects the gap had on the air entering the drum.

Simulation

Simulation Description
Air Simulation

The simulation shown is the Air temperatures at various places throughout the IR-12 Coffee Roaster during a roast

Steel Simulation

The simulation to the left is the Steel temperatures at various places throughout the IR-12 Coffee Roaster during a roast.

Statistical Analysis

Beans Hopper Description
Bean Temperature Statistics
Hopper Temperature Statistics
Temperatures analyzed at the beginning
Bean Temperature Statistics Middle of Roast
Hopper Temperature Statistics Middle of Roast
Temperatures analyzed at the middle of roast
Bean Temperature Statistics End of Roast
Hopper Temperature Statistics End of Roast
Temperatures analyzed at the end of roast



Team Members

From left to right Matthew Nichols,Benjamin Springli,Matthew Garrison.


Picture Biography Discipline
2014 MBC MattG.JPG

Matthew Garrison is a senior at the University of Idaho working toward a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. Matthew has lived in Idaho his entire life and has enjoyed many outdoor activities including, fishing, snowboarding, hiking and golfing. His interest in engineering came at a young age trying to understand how everything worked. Matthew is interested in the fields of power and manufacturing. He will be graduating in Fall 2014.

ME
2014 MBC MattN.JPG

Matthew Nichols is a senior in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Idaho. He was born in Spokane, Washington, and lived there throughout his childhood and high school years. He chose Mechanical Engineering after discovering an interest in problem solving while working on building a car after high school. He hopes to find work in thermal systems design after graduating, and has chosen to work on the coffee roaster because it is closely related to his interests within the field. He enjoys automobile racing, motorcycles, snowboarding and waterskiing in his free time.

ME
2014 MBC BenS.JPG

Benjamin Springli is expected to graduate in the Fall of 2014 with a Bachelors of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Idaho. As a true Idahoan, Ben enjoys the great outdoors and exploring the western United States with his camera in his hand. His interest in engineering spawned off his interest in the automotive industry but has since evolved into many more interests within the scope of the field with special interest in turbines and jet propulsion systems.

ME

Return to contents