Liquid NanoTint Performance Evaluation

From Mindworks
Jump to: navigation, search
[[File:|300px|center|alt=]]
Sponsors DryWired
Team Name Sunscreen
Duration Fall 2018 - Spring 2019
Faculty Adviser
  • Dr. Matthew Swenson
Mentor
  • Matthew Harned
Clients
  • DryWired
  • Fred Pollard
Team Members
  • Kendra Wallace
  • Russell Stein
  • Chancler Vander Woude
  • Oscar Lopez

An enormous amount of energy is spent heating and cooling our buildings and much of it is wasted through the building’s windows. Most options to help insulate windows and reduce solar heat gain are expensive or block out most of the window’s visible light. Liquid Nanotint offers a cheap and easy to apply coating that claims to block almost all UV and IR rays while reducing visible light transmission very little. We will be applying Liquid Nanotint to University of Idaho’s Golf Pro Shop in order to quantify the coating’s effectiveness and electricity use reduction in a real-world setting. We will also be building a demonstration unit that will show Liquid Nanotint’s benefit’s and effectiveness in real time to prospective clients.


Problem Definition[edit]

Background[edit]

The scope of this project is to test the effectiveness of DryWired's NanoTint in a real world setting by applying it to UI's Golf Pro Shop and comparing data before and after application. Design and build a portable demonstration unit to conduct small scale tests of the material.

Deliverables[edit]

Project Requirements Tests
Golf Pro Shop
  • Liquid NanoTint should be almost unnoticeable and should not block more than 40% of visible light transmission (VLT).
  • Obtain data on window solar heat gain (SHG).
  • Obtain energy savings.
  • The coating should be durable and not be able to be removed by window cleaning.
  • Dust or other contaminant inclusions should be kept below 0.5 inclusions per square inch.
  • Use a VLT meter to measure the amount of visible light that is coming through the windows.
  • Place HOBO sensors on windows and electriacl panel to measure temperature and electricity draw.
  • Place HOBO sensors on windows and electriacl panel to measure temperature and electricity draw.
  • Use window cleaning procedures and observe any peeling, cracking, bubbling, or fading.
  • Sample random square inches of the window for visible inclusions  to determine rate.
Demonstration Unit
  • Demonstrate the difference in UV between coated and uncoated panes of glass.
  • Demonstrate the difference in IR between coated and uncoated panes of glass.
  • Demonstrate the difference in VLT between coated and uncoated panes of glass.
  • The total system should not exceed 20 lbs.
  • Needs to be portable.
  • Size should not exceed 2.5' by 2.5'.
  • Needs to be able to be shipped.
  • The unit needs to withstand travel and shipping.
  • Attach a UV sensor to tabletop demonstration and measure the amount of UV coming through each pane.
  • Using a heat lamp, measure the amount of IR that is coming through both panes of glass. 
  • Use a VLT meter to measure the amount of visible light that each pane is allowing  through.
  • Weight the total system (including glass) on a scale.
  • Test that the unit can be take apart easily and put back together. 
  • Measure the width and length.
  • Place in a shipping box with packing materials to ensure that it is small enough to ship easily.
  • Place unit in a shipping box with packing materials and shake/drop to simulate rough shipping enviroments. Use ASTM D7386 testing procedure.

Team Members[edit]

Kendra Wallace

Major: Material Science Engineering
Hometown: Kent, Washington
Graduation Date: Spring 2019
Email: wall3657@vandals.uidaho.edu


Russell Stein

Major: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Rathdrum, Idaho
Graduation Date: Spring 2019
Email: stei6516@vandals.uidaho.edu


Chancler Vander Woude

Major: Material Science Engineering
Hometown: Boise, Idaho
Graduation Date: Spring 2019
Email: vand2238@vandals.uidaho.edu


Oscar Lopez

Major: Mechanical Engineering
Hometown: Bonners Ferry, Idaho
Graduation Date: Spring 2019
Email: lope5028@vandals.uidaho.edu