Power electronic circuit containing a hardware Trojan

From Mindworks
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Team Picture
Sponsors Department of electrical engineering, UI
Team Name
  • Hide and Seek
Duration
  • Spring 2020 - Fall 2020
Faculty Adviser
  • Dr Herbert Hess
  • Dr Joseph D.Law
Mentor
  • Dr Herbert Hess
Client
  • Dr Herbert Hess
Team Members
  • Torben Fisher
  • Stephen Hain
  • TianYi Zhang
  • HaiYang Tang

The goal of the project is to design and fabricate a power electronic circuit contains a hardware Trojan.


Problem Definition[edit]

We first found a power converter circuit and became familiar with its construction and the components in the circuit. Once we knew the circuit inside out, we started to simulate it on the computer, looking at its current, voltage, and power characteristics, so that we could find a way to destroy the circuit. When we find the right way to destroy the circuit and the right place to hide our destruction point, we first simulate the results on the computer, then buy the necessary circuit components, and then build the circuit on the board, to conduct real experiments.
There are two key points to this project. One is how to destroy the circuitry. Is it permanent or temporary? Was it silent destruction or an explosion in the circuit caused by too much power? The other is how to hide the point of destruction. Do you make it as small as possible or do you use camouflage like animals in nature? These are all things that need to be explored.In this project, we specifically studied the buck converter circuit and the boost converter circuit.

Background[edit]

With the development of electronic technology, network security becomes more important. However, hardware security is also significant. Now most of the technology is inseparable from chips, IC circuits, data storage, and so on. The protection of the high-end technology of these electronic equipments and the security problem of the data are also increasingly prominent. The big electronics companies don't want the results of their research to get out, so they do their best to protect their products. Nevertheless, there are times when electronics companies can not protect their products, so they will destroy them if they have to. The project focuses on how to build an electronic circuit and have it destroy itself if needed.

Objective[edit]

Our project focuses on how to create a power electronic circuit with the ability to self-destruct or modify its behavior on demand. This project will be challenging both the Buck and the Boost converters, specifically.

Circuit Simulation[edit]

Choose a suitable circuit[edit]

Boost converter circuit[edit]

Introduction[edit]

This circuit is called a boost converter or a step-up converter because the output voltage is large than the input.

This is another switching converter that operates by periodically opening and closing an electronic switch.

A boost converter circuit was choose with a frequency of 120kHz. The purpose is to increase the voltage input from 5V to an output of 12V.

Calculation[edit]


Selective component[edit]

alt text
alt text
alt text
alt text


Circuit Diagram[edit]

alt text














Testing and Verification[edit]

The figure shown on the left is the voltage change at the output resistor when the circuit is working properly. The figure on the right is the output after changing the switching frequency. The voltage has reached 90V. So the load does not work properly because it is high and runs the risk of damage to the circuit.

alt text
alt text


Feedback and Thinking[edit]


Buck converter circuit[edit]

Introduction[edit]

This circuit is called a buck converter or a step-down converter because the output voltage is less than the input.

This is another switching converter that operates by periodically opening and closing an electronic switch.

A buck converter circuit was choose with a frequency of 120kHz. The purpose is to reduce the voltage input from 12V to an output of 5V.

Calculation[edit]


Selective component[edit]

alt text
alt text
alt text
alt text


Circuit Diagram[edit]

alt text

















Testing and Verification[edit]

The figure shown on the left is the voltage change at the output resistor when the circuit is working properly. The figure on the right is the output after changing the switching frequency. The voltage is only 2.6V. So the load does not work work properly as it odes not meet the rated voltage.

alt text
alt text


Feedback and Thinking[edit]


Circuit components Specifications[edit]

Design Considerations[edit]

Project Learning[edit]

Components

Research Information

Final Design[edit]

Validation[edit]

Team Members[edit]

Necessary explanation:We are a real team, no matter which member of the team is in trouble, we will do our best to help him. So the responsibility has been given is the primary responsibility, does not mean that we have only these responsibilities.

Picture Introduction
AB8ED129B577D3EF53B8C7BCF0ACC8F3.jpg
  • Name: Torben Fisher
  • Major:'Electrical Engineering'
  • Hometown:
  • Responsibility:'Documentation Manager, Team Leader(Take turns)'
  • Email:'fish1365@vandals.uidaho.edu'


QQ图片20200302093200.jpg
  • Name: Stephen Hain
  • Major:'Electrical Engineering'
  • Hometown:'Orofino Idaho USA'
  • Responsibility:'Meeting Minutes Recorder, Team Leader(Take turns)'
  • Email:'hain5687@vandals.uidaho.edu'


QQ图片20200302093142.jpg
  • Name: Tianyi Zhang
  • Major:'Electrical Engineering'
  • Hometown:'Wuxi Jiangsu China'
  • Responsibility:'Budget Manager, Team Leader(Take turns)'
  • Email:'tian7907@vandals.uidaho.edu'


QQ图片20200302093153.jpg
  • Name: Haiyang Tang
  • Major:'Electrical Engineering'
  • Hometown:'Xuzhou Jiangsu China'
  • Responsibility:'Wikipage Master, Team Leader(Take turns)'
  • Email:'tang6382@vandals.uidaho.edu'


Additional Documentation[edit]

Project Schedule

Gantt Chart

Meeting Agendas

Meeting Agendas

Meeting Minutes

Meeting Minutes

Presentations

Presentations

Design Review

Design Review

Budget

Budget